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How Piano Players’ Brains Are Actually Different From Everybody Elses’

How Piano Players’ Brains Are Actually Different From Everybody Elses’

I recently stumbled across a very interesting article. If you play a music instrument, you would have heard many times how music helps with the brain development and such. But this interesting articles talks specifically about pianist.

Pianists’ brains are actually different from those of everyone else. Drums are functionally pitchless and achordal, so pitch selection and chord voicings aren’t part of the equation. Guitar only allows for six notes at once and heavily favors left-hand dexterity.

But piano is the ultimate instrument in terms of skill and demand: Two hands have to play together simultaneously while navigating 88 keys. They can play up to 10 notes at a time. To manage all those options, pianists have to develop a totally unique brain capacity — one that has been revealed by science.

Because both hands are required to be equally active for pianists’ to master their instrument, they have to overcome something innate to almost every person: right or left-handedness.

In most people, the depth of the brain’s central sulcus is either deeper on the right or on the left side, which then determines which hand is dominant. But when scientists scanned the brains of pianists, they found something different: Pianists had a demonstrably more symmetrical central sulcus than everyone else — though they were born right or left-handed, their brains barely registered it. Because the pianists still had a dominant hand, researchers speculated that their equal depth was not natural, but resulted because pianists are able to strengthen their weaker side to more closely match their dominant side.

You can read the full article here.

V.Kugantharan

Founder at Joy With Music
Kugan was introduced to the piano at the age of 5 and has not looked back since. With more than 25 years of experience on the piano and fueled by his passion for music, he launched Joy with Music with hopes of inspiring more people to pick up this wonderful instrument and learn to express themselves through it.

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